Catching the fleeting scenes of many splendored life with a camera.
'Look closely. The beautiful may be small' — Kant

For the lovers of brainy talk — my other blog, BRAINSTORMING IDEAS.

16 November 2013

Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea), Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) and Little Egret (Egretta garzetta garzetta)

The Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea), is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native to temperate Europe, Asia and parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds migrate in winter from colder regions. It is a large bird, measuring 84–102 cm (33–40 in) long with a 155–195 cm (61–77 in) wingspan and creating an impressive hovering silhouette against the sky. Unlike storks, cranes and spoonbills which extend their necks in flight, grey heron flies slowly with its long neck retracted (S-shaped), which is characteristic of herons and bitterns. However I captured this one flying with its neck outstretched (and performing acrobatics in the air), apparently because the bird was trying to eat the fish it was holding in its claws.

Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) in flight with its neck extended
(© LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

The Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), aka Great Black Cormorant across the Northern Hemisphere, the Black Cormorant in Australia, the Large Cormorant in India and the Black Shag further south in New Zealand, is a widespread member of the cormorant family of sea birds. It breeds in much of the Old World and the Atlantic coast of North America.

Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) in flight. (© LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Great Cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) perched on birch tree
(© LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Little Egret (Egretta garzetta garzetta) is native to Europe, Africa, and most of Asia except the southeast. 

Little Egret (Egretta garzetta garzetta) flying up to the sky
(© LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

2 comments:

  1. How wonderful to have those big birds flying about. You've done a superb job catching their flight. I'm especially taken with your photo of the little Egret. It shows the essence of flight so well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks a lot. To my eye, bird flight is one of the most fascinating and inspiring things in this world. I'm forever trying to capture flying birds (though I miss more often than I hit).

      Delete

Speak out, I'm listening.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...