Catching the fleeting scenes of many splendored life with a camera.
'Look closely. The beautiful may be small' — Kant

21 May 2011

Spring colours. Red, lilac, pink, white, yellow, blue, violet and their hues.

In Spring, wherever you turn your head you find something blooming, flowering or singing. Every year I discover something new in apparently familiar environment — that's the beauty of observing the Nature. Red is my favourite colour — to my eye, without something red the scene lacks verve, impetus, energy, passion. Even a drop of red makes everything look more vivid.

Red geranium flower (Pelargonium hortorum)
Red geranium flower (Pelargonium hortorum).
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Opening poppy buds
Opening poppy buds (field poppies). (© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Poppy flower
Poppy flower (field poppy). (© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Poppy flowers and buds in the wind
Poppy flowers (field poppies) and buds in the wind.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Poppy flower with a bud
Poppy flower (field poppy) with a bud.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

According to Greek mythology, Asphodel meadows is a neutral land where the souls of people who were neither good nor evil in their earthly lives dwell. One of these useful tales to manipulate the plebs.
Well, these are the asphodels of our world.

Onionweed, onion-leaved asphodel (Asphodelus fistulosus)
Onionweed, onion-leaved asphodel (Asphodelus fistulosus) 
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Purple starthistle, Centaurea calcitrapa
Purple starthistle, Centaurea calcitrapa.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Spartium junceum (Spanish Broom, Weaver's Broom)
Spartium junceum (Spanish Broom or Weaver's Broom)
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)
This beautiful trailing plant commonly used in hedges gives off sweet fragrance and together with other sweet-scented plants gives the street an air of enchanted realm.

Fragrant wisteria, Wisteria amethist
Fragrant wisteria, Wisteria amethist cluster against the light.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Fragrant wisteria, Wisteria amethist cluster
Fragrant wisteria, Wisteria amethist cluster. (
© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Fragrant wisteria, Wisteria amethist
Fragrant wisteria, Wisteria amethist.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Pale lilac geranium flowers (Pelargonium graveolens)
Pale lilac geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) flowers.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

This is a posy of wildflowers I gathered in the field.

Spring wildflower nosegay in a vase
Spring wildflower nosegay with poppies and rock-rose flowers in a crystal vase
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Spring wildflower bouquet with poppies
Spring wildflower bouquet with poppies and rock-rose flowers.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

These wildflowers can only be found on the meadows that haven't been maimed with a lawnmower and therefore all plants survive.

Lavatera arborea or Malva arborea, the Tree Mallow, is a species of mallow native to the coasts of western Europe and the Mediterranean region, from the British Isles south to Algeria and Libya, and east to Greece.
Lavatera arborea tolerates sea water to varying degrees, at up to 100% sea water in its natural habitat, excreting salt through glands on its leaves.
The leaves of the species are used in herbal medicine to treat sprains, by steeping them in hot water and applying the poultice to the affected area, as well as an alternative to toilet paper. The seeds are edible and are known in Jersey as "petit pains", or "little breads".

Anchusa azurea (large blue alkanet) and Lavatera arborea (Tree Mallow)
Anchusa azurea (large blue alkanet) and Lavatera arborea (Tree Mallow)
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

One of my favourite combinations of colours: lilac or purple, blue, pink, violet and their hues.

Echium plantagineum, Purple Viper Bugloss
Echium plantagineum, Purple Viper Bugloss.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Echium plantagineum, Purple Viper Bugloss flowers
Echium plantagineum, Purple Viper Bugloss flowers.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Echium plantagineum, Purple Viper Bugloss flowers close-up
Echium plantagineum, Purple Viper Bugloss flowers close-up. 
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

All parts of the wildflower below are edible. Good to know in case you need to survive in the wild. On top of this, it's a very efficient remedy for many liver diseases (especially the seeds). Silymarin from milk thistle protects against liver damage and brain aging.
The seeds of the milk thistle have been used for 2000 years to treat chronic liver disease and protect the liver against toxins.
The only catch is that it's spiky, so you can hardly handle it with bare hands.

Milk Thistle flower
Milk thistle flower.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

Milk thistle flower head
Milk thistle flower head.
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

This lovely fly (sometimes called flower fly or syrphid fly)  feed mainly on nectar and pollen as an adult, while the larvae (maggots) eat a wide range of foods. In some species, the larvae are saprotrophs, eating decaying plant and animal matter in the soil or in ponds and streams. In other species, the larvae are insectivores and prey on aphids, thrips, and other plant-sucking insects.

Male hoverfly on Field Scabious (Knautia arvensis)
Male hoverfly on Field Scabious (Knautia arvensis).
(© 2011 LightColourShade. All rights reserved)

2 comments:

  1. These are wonderful. There is something about that lilac geranium, and the two photos of the milk thistle that stand out in my mind, but they're all great photos.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for commenting. In case of lilac geranium it must be the combination of colours -- lilac, green and reddish brown. As for the thistle -- it's a very stylish flower. ;)

    ReplyDelete

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